The number one reason to deal with the summer in Tucson is almost gone. Eegee’s Watermelon.

The number one reason to deal with the summer in Tucson is almost gone. Eegee’s Watermelon.

titam:

Portrait of Marie Barbara Eleonore zu Schaumburg-Lippe by Johann Georg Ziesenis (c. 1765). (Kaiser Friedrich-Museums, Berlin). She was born in 1744, died 1776, and was married on the 12 November 1765 at Stadthagen to Wilhelm, Count of Schaumburg-Lippe-Bückeburg (9 January 1724 – 10 September 1777), born Friedrich Wilhelm Ernst Graf zu Schaumburg-Lippe-Bückeburg, a ruler of the County of Schaumburg-Lippe-Bückeburg, and an important military commander in the Seven Years’ War. They had two children, Countess Emilie (1771–1774), and an unnamed son (1772-1772).

titam:

Portrait of Marie Barbara Eleonore zu Schaumburg-Lippe by Johann Georg Ziesenis (c. 1765). (Kaiser Friedrich-Museums, Berlin). She was born in 1744, died 1776, and was married on the 12 November 1765 at Stadthagen to Wilhelm, Count of Schaumburg-Lippe-Bückeburg (9 January 1724 – 10 September 1777), born Friedrich Wilhelm Ernst Graf zu Schaumburg-Lippe-Bückeburg, a ruler of the County of Schaumburg-Lippe-Bückeburg, and an important military commander in the Seven Years’ War. They had two children, Countess Emilie (1771–1774), and an unnamed son (1772-1772).

…But when the blast of war blows in our ears then imitate the action of the tiger.

Henry V. Act 3, Scene 1
Enter KING HENRYEXETERBEDFORD,GLOUCESTER, and soldiers, with scaling ladders

thinksquad:

The realities of an Internet without net neutrality are about to become a bit more obvious.
In a move out of the anti-SOPA campaign playbook, Fight for the Future and other net neutrality activist groups have set up the Battle for the Net coalition, which plans to launch an “Internet slowdown day” later this month.
No actual traffic will be slowed down. Instead, participating sites will display embeddable modules that include a spinning “loading” symbol and information about contacting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the White House, and members of Congress.
“The Internet slowdown is a symbolic and creative action that empowers websites to show their users a message that gives them a sense of what the Internet could be like if we lost net neutrality,” Evan Greer, the campaign manager for Fight for the Future, told The Daily Dot.
Fight for the Future plans to post metrics at the end of the day on September 10—the FCC’s original deadline for net neutrality comments—listing how many comments and phone calls the effort generates. Their embeddable widgets will also let the group “generate a leaderboard of which sites or people are helping drive the most traffic,” according to Greer.
The FCC recently extended its deadline for comments on the agency’s net neutrality proposal to September 15, five days after Fight for the Future’s Internet slowdown day.
“There’s a lot of urgency in getting in a huge showing before this next comment deadline on September 15,” Greer said. “That doesn’t mean that this is the last moment or even necessarily the largest in this fight. This is going to push forward.”
In the meantime, prepare to see a lot of loading symbols when browsing the Internet on September 10. If Greer and her colleagues succeed, more people will begin to associate those annoying symbols with Internet fast lanes and other attacks on net neutrality.
“We want to show people what’s at stake if we lose net neutrality,” Greer said, “because it’s pretty difficult to explain it.”
http://www.dailydot.com/politics/net-neutrality-internet-slowdown-day-fcc/
Zoom Info
thinksquad:

The realities of an Internet without net neutrality are about to become a bit more obvious.
In a move out of the anti-SOPA campaign playbook, Fight for the Future and other net neutrality activist groups have set up the Battle for the Net coalition, which plans to launch an “Internet slowdown day” later this month.
No actual traffic will be slowed down. Instead, participating sites will display embeddable modules that include a spinning “loading” symbol and information about contacting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the White House, and members of Congress.
“The Internet slowdown is a symbolic and creative action that empowers websites to show their users a message that gives them a sense of what the Internet could be like if we lost net neutrality,” Evan Greer, the campaign manager for Fight for the Future, told The Daily Dot.
Fight for the Future plans to post metrics at the end of the day on September 10—the FCC’s original deadline for net neutrality comments—listing how many comments and phone calls the effort generates. Their embeddable widgets will also let the group “generate a leaderboard of which sites or people are helping drive the most traffic,” according to Greer.
The FCC recently extended its deadline for comments on the agency’s net neutrality proposal to September 15, five days after Fight for the Future’s Internet slowdown day.
“There’s a lot of urgency in getting in a huge showing before this next comment deadline on September 15,” Greer said. “That doesn’t mean that this is the last moment or even necessarily the largest in this fight. This is going to push forward.”
In the meantime, prepare to see a lot of loading symbols when browsing the Internet on September 10. If Greer and her colleagues succeed, more people will begin to associate those annoying symbols with Internet fast lanes and other attacks on net neutrality.
“We want to show people what’s at stake if we lose net neutrality,” Greer said, “because it’s pretty difficult to explain it.”
http://www.dailydot.com/politics/net-neutrality-internet-slowdown-day-fcc/
Zoom Info

thinksquad:

The realities of an Internet without net neutrality are about to become a bit more obvious.

In a move out of the anti-SOPA campaign playbook, Fight for the Future and other net neutrality activist groups have set up the Battle for the Net coalition, which plans to launch an “Internet slowdown day” later this month.

No actual traffic will be slowed down. Instead, participating sites will display embeddable modules that include a spinning “loading” symbol and information about contacting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the White House, and members of Congress.

“The Internet slowdown is a symbolic and creative action that empowers websites to show their users a message that gives them a sense of what the Internet could be like if we lost net neutrality,” Evan Greer, the campaign manager for Fight for the Future, told The Daily Dot.

Fight for the Future plans to post metrics at the end of the day on September 10—the FCC’s original deadline for net neutrality comments—listing how many comments and phone calls the effort generates. Their embeddable widgets will also let the group “generate a leaderboard of which sites or people are helping drive the most traffic,” according to Greer.

The FCC recently extended its deadline for comments on the agency’s net neutrality proposal to September 15, five days after Fight for the Future’s Internet slowdown day.

“There’s a lot of urgency in getting in a huge showing before this next comment deadline on September 15,” Greer said. “That doesn’t mean that this is the last moment or even necessarily the largest in this fight. This is going to push forward.”

In the meantime, prepare to see a lot of loading symbols when browsing the Internet on September 10. If Greer and her colleagues succeed, more people will begin to associate those annoying symbols with Internet fast lanes and other attacks on net neutrality.

“We want to show people what’s at stake if we lose net neutrality,” Greer said, “because it’s pretty difficult to explain it.”

http://www.dailydot.com/politics/net-neutrality-internet-slowdown-day-fcc/